Medical Retirement from Federal Gov. Employment: Degree versus knowledge

Does a degree hold as much worth, if everyone possesses one? Why are the economics of supply and demand not attached to degrees conferred by so-called institutions of “higher learning”? Is the degree conferred of value because of the opportunities granted by the elevated status, or by the knowledge gained and imparted? Or is the disjunctive bifurcation into universes of counterparts, between diploma represented as opposed to a jewelry box of wisdom, an offer of false alternatives, when some may indeed gain knowledge […] Read More …

Federal Employee Disability Retirement: Caution

It is the characteristic which precludes and prevents unnecessary harm, and allows for the survival instinct to flourish; yet, as with most traits, there are both positive and negative aspects to it. Yes, the telltale signs of hesitation, trepidation in approach, care in proceeding, and sometimes outright flight, allows for the evolutionary dominance of survival of the fittest and the genetic propagation of a species on the rise. In modernity, however, when the dangers once diverse in the State of Nature are no longer applicable, that same innate fingerprint can be the preventative modality of stunted growth. What was once the thrust for endurance of longevity may now be the invisible thread which holds back. […] Read More …

OPM Medical Retirement: Days of Partial Life

To whom do we owe our due? What motivates, compels and propels? Is it by way of a sense of indebtedness (a sort of negation attempting to claw back and regain a foothold), or an assertion of one’s rightful ownership of life, land and property? Or perhaps there is a sense of a higher calling, whether by teleological justification, or a whisper of duty? […] Read More …

Federal Employee Disability Retirement (FERS & CSRS): Computational Intentionality

Presumptuous intentionality will lead to an assumption which ultimately undermines one’s own argument; and in every endeavor, a computational approach based upon a general algorithm of life’s experiences will often leave out key factors and essential elements. The problem with one’s own medical condition is that the person who experiences it is one and the same as the person who must convey the experiential factor to others. That is what is often termed an “epistemological privilege“, in that the subjectivity of the medical condition, the pain, the psychiatric disorder, the cognitive dysfunction, one’s inability to focus or concentrate, etc. […] Read More …